Will & Lynn Gorges
CivilWarShop.com
Battleground Antiques Inc.

3910 U.S. Hwy 70 East
New Bern, N.C. 28560
Phone (252) 636-3039
Fax (252) 637-1862
tarheelrebel2000@aol.com

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MODERN FIREARMS
Items requiring a FFL or C&R and related
accessories
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BOOKS & PUBLICATIONS
Books: Collectable and Reference
volumes

 

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Exceptional Confederate Griswold and Gunnison revolver #1105. This weapon is truly an outstanding example of a primary Confederate States of America factory produced First Model percussion revolver as manufactured under direct military contract circa April to May, 1863, at Griswoldville, Georgia. The revolver falls between two known serial numbers as noted in Confederate Handguns (#1101 and #1146), both of which have been known on the collector and researcher market since the early 1960s. This rare handgun is absolutely untouched in all respects and does not appear to even have had a screw turned since the Civil War era. Finish is 100% original overall.

This weapon additionally has an associated provenance to William F. Flowers of the 1st and 4th North Carolina (Confederate) Cavalry as researched by a previous owner. Investment grade.

SOLD

Very rare Confederate cavalry carbine as manufactured and assembled at the Richmond Arsenal in Virginia circa early 1863 (see page 107, C.S. Armory Richmond by Paul J. Davies). This is a classic example of the type of weapons produced in Richmond which utilized both arsenal manufactured parts as well as parts from captured US weapons...it has a 25" barrel with "pinched" front sight and has the re-inspection "star" marking at the rear of the breech as detailed on page 607 of Confederate Rifles & Muskets by Murphy and Madaus. The iron buttplate has a US marking, very typical for this series. The lower sling swivel which is normally in the buttstock is missing but the stock is correctly tapped to accept the threaded assembly. Priced very well for a primary Confederate weapon.

$6,500

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US Model 1861 .58 Rifle Musket by Norwich Arms Company of Norwich, Connecticut, dated 1864. A total of 25,000 of these were manufactured in 1863 and 1864 under direct Federal contract to arm Union Infantry. This weapon is extremely nice, unmolested, and complete in all respects. It has a pleasing light brown overall patina with NO evidence of cleaning or polishing AT ALL--will clean EXC+.

SOLD


Fresh off the presses! The singular BEST price guide out there
for original Civil War related memorabilia, the 2011 Edition of North
South Trader Guide. Current market retail prices on about anything Civil
War you can imagine as well as profuse illustrations on many pieces.
Available for delivery to the continental US for $45.00 total (NC
residents must add 6.75% sales tax to total).


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One of the most rare and historical Civil War artifacts to ever enter the private collector market, the battle sword of the "Heroine of New Bern," Kady Brownell ! With ease, Kady Brownell is one of the most famous women of the entire American Civil War and the U.S. military in general--I will not list her entire history because it would take PAGES--if you don't know who she was, just Google her name. Kady, the "Daughter" of the 1st and 5th Rhode Island Infantry Regiments, the honorary and in-combat COLOR BEARER, a field nurse, a vivandiere supreme, and the only woman to receive a pension as a Civil War soldier (granted by a special act of Congress), at the least had an extraordinary life. She is credited with saving the lifes of many of her male comrads at the Battle of New Bern on March 14, 1862 and was an active participant in the Battle of First Manassas (Bull Run) earlier. By special instruction of General Ambrose P. Burnside, her often mentioned "sergeant's sword" was to have her name "chiseled" or "carved" into it...and that is exactly what was done. The sword is a unique variant of the US Militia Noncommissioned Officer Sword (Peterson 11, 12) also known as the "Sergeant's Pattern." The sword itself is very unique having a much wider blade (1.25") and 3/4 length median ridge along the relatively short 23 3/4" blade-- no doubt to correspond to her height. The grip is of fluted bone and the cruciform guard is brass. The pommel cap is a standard helmet pattern with a plume resembling those manufactured by Ames of Chicopee, Massachusetts. The commonly known photograph of her with her sword clearly verifies it is the same one she is holding. The scabbard mounts have her name deeply impressed in them as well as "1st R.I.D.M." 1861. These initials are those of the 1st Rhode Island Detatched Militia, a "first call" unit that only existed for approximately 90 days in 1861. One side of the sword blade has engraving scratched into it which appears to be "Presented to Kady Brownell A. Co. 1 (probably 1st Rhode Island) and the other side appears to be "Sergeant Kady Brownell R.I." -- both sides of the blade where the lettering is present show age and wear and are absolutely genuine and of the period. Truly one of the finest and most unique collectibles I have encountered in over thirty years in the trade.

SOLD


IDENTIFIED Colt Model 1851 Navy percussion revolver serial number 37xxx (manufactured in 1854). Exceptional Civil War era weapon with original flap holster as manufactured by Davy under US Army contract circa 1861. Neatly carved in the flap and on the reverse side is "T. Keefe Co. H 24th Cav." Timothy Keefe mustered into the 24th New York Cavalry on January 7, 1864, and was assigned to Company H. He is noted as wounded in action during his term of service but the place is not stated (will likely show on actual muster rolls when researched). This unit was heavily engaged at the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor and the Petersburg Mine Explosion as well as many other campaigns in Northern Virginia. Despite being mustered relatively late in the War, this unit lost seven officers and 113 enlistedmen killed in action or mortally wounded and combined with other losses to disease accidents or life in Confederate prisons, a total of 254 of its numbers failed to return home from the War. A very historical weapon in exceptionally nice condition overall.

SOLD

 

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Secondary Confederate Model 1842 musket by William Glaze of Columbia, South Carolina, aka “Palmetto Armory.” Manufactured in 1852 for use by militia troops of the state of South Carolina, this weapon is only one of three known with a long range rear sight affixed. Once in the private collection of William Edwards, author of “Civil War Guns,” this fine weapon is unmolested in any way and retains a full deep brown patina overall. The William Glaze marking is more visible on the barrel than the digital camera actually shows and all other markings are clean and crisp. It was purchased by John Sexton of Stone Mountain Relics several years ago from Charles Edwards, the son of the author. Fine and rare of an example as you will ever encounter.

$17,500

Regulation Civil War enlisted forage cap as manufactured by Lewis J. & Issac Phillips of New York City, NY, circa 1861-1863. Size #2 (6 7/8 ) with nice original tag, original chinstrap and side buttons and only one minor area of insect damage (as shown).

SOLD

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Beautiful Colt Pocket percussion revolver Model 1849, S/N 223,5xx as manufactured in very early 1863. Generous finish, crisp markings and traces of blue and case colors--very crisp example and fresh from a Pennsylvania estate sale--a very good chance it could have seen Gettysburg!

$1,650

Regulation Civil War enlisted forage cap as manufactured by Thompson, Goodrich & Company (M. Thompson and Charles Goodrich of Cincinnati, Ohio) circa 1863-1864 who also had distributors in New York circa 1863-1864. Size #3 (7 1/8 ) with nice original tag, full lining, original chinstrap and side buttons and only one minor area of insect damage (as shown).

SOLD

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Bona fide Civil War field used weapon as recovered from a creekbed outside of Richmond, Virginia...a true battlefield relic in all respects and totally complete, just as dropped or tossed during the Civil War. There is no doubt THIS ONE saw battlefield use! Carefully preserved and mounted on a 150+ year old slab of heart pine from an old Virginia barn, this great relic is ready for display or as the centerpiece of your dug collection.

$1,250


Identified KIA Union Frock Coat! Original 1862 issue infantry enlisted frock coat of Pvt. Wilfred Barker, Company G, 18th New Hampshire Infantry who died in action in an assault on Fort Stedman on April 2, 1865, before Petersburg, Virginia. This frock, complete with original New Hampshire buttons, is a prime example of a state issued frock and is incredibly rare -- very few exist even in museum collections. The coat is faded from age and has numerous areas of insect damage from the traces of blood on it...the vermin tend to attack those spots first. This coat is well documented and surfaced at an auction in New Hampshire about a decade ago and is accompanied by an original copy of the unit regimental history.

$7,500

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Exceptional and rare Virginia identified Confederate officer kepi, fresh estate purchase!  This is a wonderful example of a regulation pattern chasseur grade Confederate officer cap which belonged to Lt. William Hill Harwood, Jr., who served in the 53rd Virginia Infantry, Company K and later in the 3rd Virginia Cavalry, Company C.  Harwood enlisted in 1861 as a Corporal and was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in 1863 and 1st Lieutenant in 1864.  He was killed in action April 7, 1865 at Farmville, Virginia, a victim of artillery fire--so close to the end of the War and so very tragic.  The hat is accompanied with numerous direct family documents including an overview genealogy. The simple leather chinstrap is secured by two script "I" Infantry Confederate gilt plated, brass buttons.

The hat has had professional restoration as much of the jeans cloth lower band was damaged by insects and a small section of quatrefoil is missing on the back as shown.  Rather than replace it, the original section was simply replaced as it was.  This kepi is a custom tailor grade and very similar to examples manufactured in Charleston, SC, early in the War and sent to sutlers and agents in the field.

SOLD


Beautiful pair of Smith Patent shoulder straps with early 1861 style stencil on reverse. Very, very difficult straps to locate on the open market as officers in artillery were few and far between compared to infantry units. Standard grade for light and heavy artillery, 2nd Lieutenant.

$595

Nice example of a relatively uncommon sword, the US Model 1840/60 Militia Staff Officer, by Ames. Made by Ames Manufacturing of Chicopee, Mass, circa 1855-1860, these beautifully crafted swords shared common traits with the US Model 1832 General Staff Officer and are often found used by state officers from both the North and the South during the early years of the Civil War. Clearly marked Ames on both the blade and brass scabbard, the fluted blade is etched with the typical florals and military motifs encountered. The grip is a silvery finish on what appears to be bone or wood and the simple chain guard is missing. A bargain price for a scarce Ames pattern Civil War officer pattern sword.

SOLD

Pristine pair of Smith Patent Major of infantry shoulder straps--as with all infantry staff ranks (Major and above), these beautiful straps have the darker blue background and a wonderful overall patina. Fresh from a museum deaccession in upstate NY. Exceptional.

$695

Fine pair of Smith Patent line infantry officer shoulder straps in sky blue, the REAL combat guys! Straps show evidence of actual field use and wear.

$375

Wonderful Civil War era ninth plate tintype in half case of a little soldier! He is wearing a Zouave looking tunic and clearly has either a Secession Badge or a Patriotic Badge on his chest...image is very nice, but the glass in front has a small crack, upper left--will cost you about a buck to replace.

$125


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Very, very scarce iron backstrap London/Hartford Colt M1851 "Navy" percussion revolver, .36 caliber, S/N 193,9xx, incredible find and brown and totally untouched, unmolested condition...and still loaded with a live round! These guns are a bit unknown on the market and according to Swayze, are generally numbered within typical Navy ranges--has British proofs on cylinder and all matching, but so brown I really can't determine the barrel marking. Most of these were manufactured in Hartford for the English market but again, there are so few known it is difficult to pin down the exact era other than mid-1860s. A collector bargain!

SOLD


Colt Pocket percussion revolver Model 1849, .31 caliber, S/N 328,7xx circa 1871, generous amounts of original nickle finish and a REAL cowboy and going westward weapon!

$850

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Historical investment grade tactics book printed in London in 1727, Exercise for the Horse, Dragoons and Foot Forces printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty. This fantastic pre-Revolutionary War leather bound book has the bookplate in the front of Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), one of six aides-de-camp to General George Washington in 1777 and who rode beside Washington in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. Hamilton was the first US Secretary of the Treasury (September 11, 1789) and leader of the Federalist Party--thus a long time political enemy of Thomas Jefferson. Hamilton was killed in a duel with Aaron Burr in 1804. If you are looking for a genuine rarity in US historical artifacts, here it is.

$12,500


Strong looking serious Yankee image, sixty plate tintype, of a fully field dressed infantryman holding his cocked Tower Enfield rifle musket in his hands. His shell jacket has shoulder tabs which generally indicate New York or Pennsylvania early war troops. Very clear photograph--flecks in online images are dust reflections--the picture is clear. In full cardboard case.

$550


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Fine Civil War era wicker and white metal accentuated glass whiskey flask. The same time seen in scores of pictures during the era--and in near pristine condition overall. The metal base also serves as the cup for a deeper draught!

SOLD


Very scarce Cooper double action percussion revolver S/N 2204, honest condition with no major defects at all and very crisp markings. A tough one to find!

$950

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Exceptional Civil War enlisted grade cavalry shell jacket complete with the original brass shoulder scales. Beautiful early War gold toned yellow worsted wool trim and in a very hard to find size 4--about a 38 in today's size. The body lining has been removed, typical for uniforms actually worn in the South, but full sleeve linings remain as well as the readily visible original arsenal issue depot stamp.

SOLD


Exceptional Artillery Officer slouch hat circa 1862-63 with a clear fragment hole in crown! By family history, this hat was worn at Gettysburg by Lt. William Pelham Wright of the 1st New York Light Artillery who was wounded in action July 3, 1863. Wright enlisted at Auburn, NY at age 27 on 10/11/1861 and was commissioned Lieutenant 11/18/1861. After being wounded, he was placed in Camp Letterman Hospital and later discharged for wounds on 6/6/1864. His mother was the well known abolitionist Martha Coffin Pelham Wright. This hat surfaced in an auction in Utica, New York, from an estate of a descendant of the McMartin family (Flora McMartin married W.P. Wright). While not a positive identification, the initials "WPW" are clearly visible under the sweatband of the hat in old brown ink.

$5,500

 

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Honest field used Starr Single Action Army percussion revolver, shows age and use, serial number on cylinder appears to be 4783, a solid representative example of a popular Cavalry weapon, .44 caliber, used in the Civil War. Pre-holiday special price

SOLD


Colt Model 1851 "Navy" .36 caliber percussion revolver S/N 101424 as manufactured in early 1861. Crisp Hartford barrel marking and weak cylinder scene and has an owner's name carved in the bottom of the brass backstrap"W.R. xxxx" (last part has been obliterated). Honest battle weapon with a chance of having Confederate use.

SOLD

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Very rare US Civil War Hospital Department bottle as excavated from a field surgery site in Virginia near the Chantilly battlefield. Aqua blue with typical stains from being buried underground for 150+ years. At one time these sold for over $750 but the economy has corrected them a bit...for now.

SOLD


Colt Model 1860 "Army" percussion revolver S/N 28,353 as manufactured in early 1862. Scarce "4-screw" frame model (originally issued with a shoulder stock to the US Army) with visible cylinder scene and strong New York barrel marking. This one is crisp enough to shoot! Includes originalflap holster which has had the lower portion shortened as often done in the field to accommodate a faster draw.

$2,350

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Beautiful piece of Civil War era gold "mourning" jewelry. T-bar pinback on this memorial item also called "hair jewelry." It was common to take a lock of hair from a deceased loved one and mount it in a fine gold locket--just like this one!

$325

 


Regulation US Model 1839 oval belt plate with solder filled back and single hook clasp. Exceptional non-dug condition overall. This pre-War plate was still actively in use during the Civil War and many times found with Confederate association. It shows obvious use overall but no damage.

$575

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Nifty little Remington .41 caliber over and under deringer pistol, smooth gray finish, nice grips and early serial number 854.

$650

Miller's Conversion to .58 rimfire (circa 1865-1867) of a Parkers' Snow Company contract M1861 rifle musket (1864). Relatively scarce weapon that utilized a breech action installed on a modified Civil War weapon. 100% original and complete and totally "attic found" from an old collection in upstate New York. One of only a few hundred ever made.

$1,250

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US Model 1855 rifled musket as manufactured at the Springfield Arsenal in Massachusetts in 1860. This weapon is one of the last of the regulation US Government contract "Maynard Tape Primer" system weapons manufactured and retains the iron patchbox as rarely seen on late production weapons.  Many of the 1860 dated weapons were shipped to arsenals in the South and are considered by most collectors to be secondary Confederate.  Standard .58 caliber bore made to accomodate the minie ball projectile. A very rare date on a primary US martial weapon.

$2,450



 

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